A group of internet artists from all over the place who have decided to give each other a challenge every few weeks, on a theme chosen by each in turn. We have different ideas and styles, but share a love of textiles, and want to have some fun.


Wednesday, 2 May 2012

TIME FOR CHANGE

I have been thrown a bit by the new layout but I shall do my best.  The work is a diptych inspired by the need for change.  I have used a decontructed Union Jack for the background, reflecting the chaotic state of the nation.  The figures were made in fabric from my own sketches & then scanned onto the background.
The captions on the placards refers to the so-called 'pasty tax' & arose from an article in the paper when a lady from Helston stated that she was thinking of putting these words in her pasty shop window.  (For non-UK members the 'pasty tax' was the name given to our government's decision to put VAT on hot pasties which had been exempt previously.  This appears to have hit the renowned Cornish pasty particularly hard).

The 2 pieces together are A3, printed onto computer transfer paper & quilted.

6 comments:

Claire said...

Really like your piece Jenny - it's very topical and very appropriate for the theme.
The use of your own sketches for the background was a great idea as well - it really gives the look of batik and African wax prints.

lisette said...

wow - that's amazing. fabulous colours and a great response to the theme

Jenny said...

Thanks for your kind words. I am smitten with this idea & am planning a continuous series. The possibilities are almost endless & I am having great fun designing backgrounds & figures.

If I ever find out how to get a blog listed on Google I might post them. Can anyone help with this?

Julie said...

I'm with Claire, striking pieces. Sadly I don't know how to get blog posts onto Google (I'm assuming you mean Google+).

Liz Plummer said...

Love these, Jenny! Brilliant political statements!

Kathryn said...

Wonderful - I love it when art becomes political! Would be great to see this further explored as a series. I agree with Claire about the African sensibility - interesting for the "seat of the empire".